TEDxTransmedia

Sep 17

Zoltan Istvan, The Transhumanist Philosopher

Last year I was lucky enough to go on a  cruise from Athens to Istanbul with a very smart crowd: the Stanford Alumni. It was a small cruise, navigating through most of the Greek islands, with a peculiarity: every day, after a perfect day relaxing on beaches to dream of, and seeing beautiful places, we had a lesson. Yes a real university lesson.
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As a matter of fact, on the cruise there were also 3 professors who would give a lesson every day. A “beautiful” way to spend vacation (at least, in my view) : an intellectual vacation.
Well, my vacation was also pollinated by other information, ideas and forecast ideas, all triggered by a book. “The Transhumanist Wager”, a philosophical science fiction book which today is a known bestseller. 
I was so engaged in the book and I immersed myself so deeply in the plot that I even skipped 2 excursions! 
Some time after my cruise, when I went to San Francisco for my course at Singularity University I asked Zoltan Istvan, the book’s author, to meet me for a coffee. We started talking about what’s in store for the future and I shared with him the TEDxTransmedia’s theme I wanted to explore for 2014.
In a sense, I got the idea from that discussion, therefore I invited him on the spot and he was the first speaker on my agenda.
Zoltan is Istvan is a philosopher, futurist, journalist, and transhumanist. 
At the age of 21, he began a solo, sailing journey around the world. His main cargo was 500 handpicked books, mostly classics. He traveled over 100 countries, many as a journalist for the National Geographic Channel and his work was covered by the most important media companies (like The New York Times, The Huffington PostThe NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX, etc) 
After the success of his book, Zoltan started actively promoting transhumanism and other futurist issues giving talks, media interviews and of course, writing.
I’m happy to have Zoltan Istvan on the stage of TEDxTransmedia 2014: he’s a techno-optimist and he will leave us with a positive feeling when looking into the future!

Sep 15

Beginning from today we will present the TEDxTransmedia speakers’ agenda. Stay tuned!

David Orban - Faculty and Advisor of Singularity University. He speaks widely on the coevolution of humanity with technology, and our future.

imageI got to know Singularity University at TED in 2012, speaking briefly to Peter Diamandis, one of the founders of the institution.

The claim of SU is - educate, inspire and empower leaders to apply exponential technologies to address humanity’s grand challenges -.

Back home I started to be interested in topics that, before then, I thought, were only for engineers and scientists. Lately though, science has become more approachable and I immersed myself in discoveries, activities and technologies that have the power to make our life better.

In November 2013, I attended the Singularity Summit in Budapest and I was still debating if I was going to fly to Silicon Valley to attend the course where, as Bloomberg Tv stated - the world’s brightest minds convene to attack the world’s toughest challenges.

Eventually I did attend SU in February 2014 and, after that, my interests/passions/activities completely changed. I became fond of robots, I learned how to manage bitcoins, I extracted my DNA, I speculated and forecasted, together with super-smart people what the future holds for us. But most importantly, I demystified the fear I had at the time of exponentially growing technologies and I actually I became part of this community.

Back to Budapest. The Summit was an incredible event, a TED like experience, not yet as widely recognized as TED, but strong, motivating and incredibly powerful.  During a break, I found myself engaged in a conversation with an Italian Singularitan crowd and I met David Orban, who speaks perfect Italian despite being Polish 

I discovered that, few years before, he launched the Network Society Project, exploring the technology based transformation of society. He was debating on the social, political and economic implications of network technologies and their application across a wide range of practices and institutions.

David is the CEO of Dotsub, a browser based, one-stop, self-contained system for creating and viewing subtitles for videos in multiple languages across all platforms. And I am pleased to announce that he will be presenting at TEDxTransmedia 2014.

Sep 12

Why Beauty?
This is the 5th TEDxTransmedia event I organize and, in reaching this milestone, I feel a strong responsibility for the speakers, for the team of volunteers that are following me (the event changed location), for the partners and particularly for the people that will choose to attend.
 
We are living a particular moment in time in which technology is growing exponentially, and each day brings a new “piece of the puzzle” to have a longer, healthier, and a more-intense life.
 
We are experiencing a magnetic and action-packed movie in which we can quantify ourselves to know how our own body functions and how its behavioral health performs. We can capture feelings with software recognition devices, live in an ubiquitous learning ecosystem, which is virtual, augmented and 3D/4K/Ultra HD.
 
Are we going to face a post-scarcity era of super-abundance where technological innovation allows its supporters to believe they are helping to generate extraordinary beings, (akin to Nietzsche’s Overman) with powers bordering on the divine? Or are we facing the enormous harm, ranging all the way to the extreme possibility of intelligent life becoming extinct?
 
Not to worry, these are not the issues covered by TEDxTransmedia 2014, but they certainly did start me thinking about the theme: Exponential Beauty.
 
Technology is growing exponentially and Ethics can’t keep the pace of this growth. Once some new moral guidance is defined, technology has already gone further.
 
How can we catch up? Is it still possible to have a positive approach if we look into the future? How can we demystify the fear we experience (more or less, I think we all fear something, facing the future)?
 
I think one of the answers can be beauty. There are a thousand definitions of beauty. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder or as Euripides said it is being “of one’s hour” or “being in the moment”.
Being in the moment today means acceleration or “growing at an exponential rate”. What do we need to know, consider, study and define in order to be prepared for an anticipated future of convergence between mankind and technology?
What if we bond beauty and technology? Can Fear diminish? Can Fear fade?
This is what we will do (together) at the 5th TEDxTramnsmedia, in Geneva, Switzerland. We are going to engage in a battle with Fear and we will win it with Beauty, with Exponential Beauty.  (to be continued)

Nicoletta Iacobacci,
TEDxTansmedia curator

Why Beauty?

This is the 5th TEDxTransmedia event I organize and, in reaching this milestone, I feel a strong responsibility for the speakers, for the team of volunteers that are following me (the event changed location), for the partners and particularly for the people that will choose to attend.

We are living a particular moment in time in which technology is growing exponentially, and each day brings a new “piece of the puzzle” to have a longer, healthier, and a more-intense life.

We are experiencing a magnetic and action-packed movie in which we can quantify ourselves to know how our own body functions and how its behavioral health performs. We can capture feelings with software recognition devices, live in an ubiquitous learning ecosystem, which is virtual, augmented and 3D/4K/Ultra HD.

Are we going to face a post-scarcity era of super-abundance where technological innovation allows its supporters to believe they are helping to generate extraordinary beings, (akin to Nietzsche’s Overman) with powers bordering on the divine? Or are we facing the enormous harm, ranging all the way to the extreme possibility of intelligent life becoming extinct?

Not to worry, these are not the issues covered by TEDxTransmedia 2014, but they certainly did start me thinking about the theme: Exponential Beauty.

Technology is growing exponentially and Ethics can’t keep the pace of this growth. Once some new moral guidance is defined, technology has already gone further.

How can we catch up? Is it still possible to have a positive approach if we look into the future? How can we demystify the fear we experience (more or less, I think we all fear something, facing the future)?

I think one of the answers can be beauty. There are a thousand definitions of beauty. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder or as Euripides said it is being “of one’s hour” or “being in the moment”.

Being in the moment today means acceleration or “growing at an exponential rate”. What do we need to know, consider, study and define in order to be prepared for an anticipated future of convergence between mankind and technology?

What if we bond beauty and technology? Can Fear diminish? Can Fear fade?

This is what we will do (together) at the 5th TEDxTramnsmedia, in Geneva, Switzerland. We are going to engage in a battle with Fear and we will win it with Beauty, with Exponential Beauty.  (to be continued)

Nicoletta Iacobacci,

TEDxTansmedia curator

Nov 06

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Nov 05

Video - Keren Elazari at TEDxTransmedia 2013 - ‘Heroes and Anti Heroes of the Information Age’

Keren has been a key member of the Israeli Cyber Security & Hacking scene in the past decade and since 2000, has been employed with leading Israeli security firms and government organizations to cover emerging security technologies.

She teaches at Tel Aviv University and at Singularity University in Palo Alto; her academic research focus on the effects of hacking and cyber warfare on global politics and national security issues.

Sep 27

“Satisfaction with an interaction with friends is greater after laughter, even if it’s just an emoticon” — Robin Dunbar on laughter at TEDxTransmedia 2013

“We have to be makers and risk-takers today we have jolt us into new ways of seeing and give us the courage to rub against the new. Together we can weave a collaborative vision of the future. Let us create more stories that give people the courage to add to the future with imagination and talent.” — Anna Reeves, #TEDxTransmedia 2013

“Wise people do not avoid pain but embrace pain and show the utility of it in order to be more authentic, to feel more, to love more, to learn more, to BE more.” — Simon Cohen on ‘How to be wise’ at TEDxTransmedia